We’d fight and die for the Hurricane Irma victims . . . why can’t we give them our aid money?

We’d fight and die for the Hurricane Irma victims . . . why can’t we give them our aid money?

That is why, when Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands, our country sent a Task Force halfway across the globe to take them back. Because these are our ­people. And we would fight and die for them.

They are self-governing but never sought independence, remaining under the jurisdiction, sovereignty and defence of the UK.

They all show the Union Jack on their flag. English is their language. Our Queen is their Queen.

The British Overseas Territories include Gibraltar, Bermuda and the Falklands. They are in the Atlantic, Pacific, the Indian Ocean and the Caribbean.

The historic bonds between us are strong and real.

And when they need British help, we give it without hesitation.

That is why, when Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands, our country sent a Task Force halfway across the globe to take them back. Because these are our ­people. And we would fight and die for them.

The British Virgin Islands, Anguilla and Turks and ­Caicos are no different from the Falkland Islands.

And they have just ­suffered the greatest disaster in their ­history.

After Hurricane Irma, we should be doing everything we can to help them in their hour of ­desperate need — and that includes diverting the £13billion we spend every year on foreign aid.

It is a national scandal that we lavish our foreign aid budget on China and India — countries with their own nuclear weapons and space programmes — while international rules forbid sending any of that £13billion to our own ­people in the Caribbean.

Nothing from that bloated aid budget will go to the Caribbean because it is deemed “too wealthy” under Organisation for ­Economic Co-operation and Development rules which dictate when money set aside for foreign aid can be ­distributed.

Too wealthy? Only if your family name is Branson.

There is undoubtedly money in the Caribbean but it is ­concentrated in the hands of the very few.

Tourism powers the Caribbean economies but precious ­little ever seems to filter down to the locals. The Caribbean, for all its undoubted sun-dappled charms, has an awful lot of poverty in ­paradise.

And that is in the best of times. These are the very worst of times.

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