Privately owned 22-mile island in the Falklands to go on sale with a value 'impossible to estimate' - and any Argentine buyers will have to be vetted by the government

Privately owned 22-mile island in the Falklands to go on sale with a value 'impossible to estimate' - and any Argentine buyers will have to be vetted by the government

Pebble Island, which is 22 miles long by four miles at its widest, to go on sale The remote isle was the site of a major SAS raid during the Falklands War A Falkland Islands Government spokesman said the value cannot be estimated Any foreign buyers will have to get a licence from the government before deal

An island in the Falklands archipelago is being sold by its private owners - but any foreigners buyers will need a government licence before snapping it up.

Pebble Island, which is 22 miles long by four miles at its widest, will be put on the market by its owner Claire Harris who doesn't yet know how much she should ask for.

The remote and windswept isle, the site of a major SAS raid during the Falklands War, boasts glorious white-sand beaches and a stunning array of flora and fauna including rockhopper penguins, sea lions and albatrosses - not mention 6,000 sheep.

Mrs Harris, a descendant of John Markham Dean who bought Pebble Island from the UK government in 1869, said she was selling because she was struggling to manage the land from her home in the UK.

She told The Times: 'I have been managing the property for the last ten years and it’s because neither I nor my sisters, or our seven children, are now in a position to keep it going that we have decided, very sadly, to sell.

'Many would say Pebble is the most beautiful in the Falklands because it is varied, with three hills, beaches, cliffs and lakes,' she added.

Mrs Harris has not found anyone who can value the island.

A spokesman for the Falkland Islands Government told MailOnline: 'It is impossible to estimate the value because islands are sold so rarely.

'The value would depend on who buys it and what they want to do with it.'

Any foreigners who want to buy land on the Falkland Islands have to obtain a licence from the Falkland Islands Government to 'make sure they are suitable and their intentions are suitable.'

This is because the lands come with conditions of use to protect local wildlife and the government has to check a new owner will not break these.

The spokesman added: 'We cannot decline a licence request on the basis of a nationality alone - there would have to be proper grounds based on intent.

'But we need to find out if their idea is to use the land for tourism or conservation or farming and find out whether they are realistic proposals.'

Parts of the Falklands Islands have been sold privately to foreigners before. A section called Dunbar Island was bought a French couple for conservation purposes while an area called Cape Dolphin is run by Greeks as a farm.

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