Argentina Repeats Sovereignty Claim To Malvinas On Bicentennial Of Raising Flag Over Land

Argentina Repeats Sovereignty Claim To Malvinas On Bicentennial Of Raising Flag Over Land

Argentina has reaffirmed its sovereignty claims to the UK-ruled Falkland Islands on the bicentennial of the first raising of its flag over the archipelago that it calls the Malvinas.

Argentina has reaffirmed its sovereignty claims to the UK-ruled Falkland Islands on the bicentennial of the first raising of its flag over the archipelago that it calls the Malvinas.

In a three-page article timed to the anniversary of the event, Felipe Carlos Sola, the Argentine minister of foreign affairs, international trade and worship, offers a historical insight into what Buenos Aires sees as the origins of its sovereignty rights to the piece of land.

"November 6th 2020 marks an anniversary of great relevance in the protracted sovereignty dispute over the Question of the Malvinas Islands: on this date, two hundred years ago, [US national at the service of the Argentine Navy] David Jewett took possession of the Malvinas Islands, raising the Argentine flag in the Islands for the first time," Sola said in the article, shared by the Argentine Foreign Ministry with Sputnik.

According to Sola, the event was seen internationally as "an official and public act that demonstrated the effective exercise of Argentine sovereignty - inherited from Spain" - over the islands, which "was not contested by the United Kingdom ... or any other foreign power" at the time.

"This significant act is a fundamental link in the long chain of measures that, beginning with the first national government and ending with the forced removal of the Argentine authorities from Puerto Soledad in January 1833, demonstrate the young Argentine State's continued and effective occupation and exercise of sovereignty over the Malvinas Islands," he said.

The minister stressed that the 1833 "usurpation" of the islands by the British Royal Navy, "which took place in times of peace, without a declaration of war, has never been consented by Argentina."

"Since then, and for the following 187 years, different Argentine governments have permanently claimed for the restitution of the full exercise of sovereignty over the Islands," Sola stated, noting that "the international community's support" had been fundamental in this claim.

The Falkland Islands, or the Malvinas remain the subject of a long-standing dispute between Argentina and the United Kingdom, which led to an armed conflict in 1982, resulting in London's victory. At that time Argentina attempted to establish itself on the islands, controlled by the UK since 1833, by force.

In March 2013, the archipelago held a referendum on the status of the territory, with 99.8 percent of local residents having preferred to remain a UK overseas territory. Argentina has not recognized the vote's results.