Families of 90 soldiers killed in Falklands War visit graves for first time

Families of 90 soldiers killed in Falklands War visit graves for first time

The mother of one fallen soldier said she "feels at peace" now that she knows where her son lies 36 years after the conflict.

The mother of one fallen soldier said she "feels at peace" now that she knows where her son lies 36 years after the conflict.

The families of 90 Argentine soldiers killed in the Falklands War have visited their graves for the first time.

Parents, siblings and other relatives travelled to the South Atlantic islands under a diplomatic accord with Britain.

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) identified the 90 soldiers by carrying out DNA testing on their remains.

They were among 121 fallen soldiers who had been interred in graves labelled "no name".

The ICRC began interviewing families of dead Argentine soldiers in 2012, and 107 consented to DNA testing.

There are 237 graves at the hilltop burial grounds known as "the Argentine cemetery" among Falkland Islanders, with 31 sets of remains still not identified.

Monday was an emotional day for those who are now able to stand by the grave they know to be holding the body of their loved one.

Dalal Massad is the mother of Daniel Massad, who died on June 11 1982. She said: "I found my son, I spoke with him, I asked him questions, I shared my feelings with him, my pain.

"I feel at peace because I know where he is."

Her son died in one of the fiercest battles in the 74-day war that cost the lives of 649 Argentine and 255 British soldiers.

The majority of the Argentines that perished were on a navy ship that sank.

Before the families began their journey to visit the graves, foreign minister Jorge Faurie told them: "Nothing is going to change history.

"Nothing is going to change the loss that each of you suffered.

"But in some way, looking at a plaque with their first and last name has a different value."

The war began when troops dispatched by then Argentine dictator Leopoldo Galtieri occupied the archipelago.

 

 

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