The eight charts showing who will win the General Election

The eight charts showing who will win the General Election

As the General Election campaign enters its last day, the most likely outcome is still for the Conservatives to return to Parliament with an increased majority

As the General Election campaign enters its last day, the most likely outcome is still for the Conservatives to return to Parliament with an increased majority.

However, it looks as though this majority will not be a landslide as the polls were indicating at the start of the campaign. 

Theresa May's Conservatives currently have an average voting intention score of 42.9 per cent in the Telegraph's poll tracker  - 5.7 points ahead of Labour's 37.2 per cent.

This is a significant reduction on the lead enjoyed by the Prime Minister's party at the start of the May, when the lead was 18.1 points.

With just one day of campaigning left before voters go to the polls, the race is reaching its climax. Jeremy Corbyn will hope that his party's momentum can see him cause an upset, while the Tories will seek to halt the Labour surge.

How the election map could look

According to a latest forecast by the University of East Anglia's Chris Hanretty, the Conservatives are on course to gain a majority in Parliament.

Thanks to seat gains in the North of England and Scotland, Mrs May would benefit from a swing of 45 seats – and end up with 375 MPs in Parliament.

45 seat gains would see the Tories end up with a majority of 100 in Parliament, with May's 375 MPs dwarfing the 275 MPs of all the other parties.

These seats would come at the cost of both the SNP and Labour, with Jeremy Corbyn left on 198 seats after losing a total of 34 MPs. 

This forecast is kinder to the Conservatives than the outcomes suggested by some pollsters. This is because Chris Hanretty's model factors in historical polling errors.

The Conservatives are traditionally underestimated in opinion polls, whereas Labour are traditionally overestimated.

The Brexit election?

Theresa May's stated purpose in calling this election was to extend her majority in order to give her a stronger mandate for negotiating Brexit.

Talk of the EU has waned over the past few weeks but in the final stages of the campaign Theresa May has sought to move the conversation back to Brexit, an area where the Conservatives are far more trusted than Labour.