Brazil’s decision on Huawei 5G to help define relationship with China, senior official says

Brazil’s decision on Huawei 5G to help define relationship with China, senior official says

Chinese ambassador Yang Wanming describes bidding process as ‘crucial’ for letting foreign companies assess ‘maturity’ of Latin America’s biggest economy. US has warned of ‘consequences’ if Brazil allows Chinese telecoms giant to build its ultra-fast mobile network.

Brazil’s coming decision on whether to allow Huawei Technologies to supply technology to its future 5G network will help define the country’s broader relationship with China, according to a senior Chinese official.

“The question is not whether Huawei will win a bid or not,” Ambassador Yang Wanming said in written responses to questions, weeks after the US warned of “consequences” if the Chinese get to build an ultra-fast fifth-generation mobile network in Brazil.

“What’s at stake is whether a country can set up market rules based on openness, impartiality and non-discrimination for all companies.”

The Chinese representative in Brasilia described the 5G bidding process as crucial for companies to assess “the maturity” of Latin America’s largest economy. “We believe Brazil will know how to make rational decisions that take into account long-term national interests,” he said.

Brazil’s coming decision on whether to allow Huawei Technologies to supply technology to its future 5G network will help define the country’s broader relationship with China, according to a senior Chinese official.

“The question is not whether Huawei will win a bid or not,” Ambassador Yang Wanming said in written responses to questions, weeks after the US warned of “consequences” if the Chinese get to build an ultra-fast fifth-generation mobile network in Brazil.
“What’s at stake is whether a country can set up market rules based on openness, impartiality and non-discrimination for all companies.”

The Chinese representative in Brasilia described the 5G bidding process as crucial for companies to assess “the maturity” of Latin America’s largest economy. “We believe Brazil will know how to make rational decisions that take into account long-term national interests,” he said.

Tensions resumed earlier this year when Eduardo Bolsonaro, a lawmaker and the president’s son, blamed the coronavirus pandemic on the “Chinese dictatorship”. Yang demanded an apology, which never happened.

Yang downplayed previous frictions and said consensus between China and Brazil “is bigger than our disagreements”.

His responses echoed similar remarks made by Brazilian Foreign Minister Ernesto Araujo, who mentioned “good bilateral perspectives” during a rare telephone call with his Chinese counterpart, Wang Yi, last month.

www.prensa.cancilleria.gob.ar es un sitio web oficial del Gobierno Argentino